Crime Prevention through Housing Design – Rachel Armitage

Crime Prevention through Housing DesignThe next book in Martin Gill’s Crime Prevention and Security Management series has now been published.

This book reviews the impact of residential design on crime and considers the current, and historic, importance placed upon crime prevention within the planning system. Armitage provides a comprehensive review of policy and practice in planning crime prevention both nationally and internationally.

Bridging the gap between design and criminology, Armitage uses opportunity theories to provide practical recommendations for the implementation of design. Enhanced by extensive visual examples, the book promotes a collaborative, long-term approach of designing out crime, conveying the positive impact of design upon the environment and crime prevention.

This book will appeal to scholars in criminology, policing, urban studies and architecture as well as practitioners in the role of planning, developing and managing residential housing. The book is priced at £55 and can be ordered here: http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?pid=540606

 

This book is essential reading for anyone concerned with crime and disorder in the built environment. It combines an encyclopaedic knowledge of relevant research with clear advice to practitioners and policy-makers. Planners and politicians whose decisions shape our towns and cities must heed Rachel Armitage’s sensible and well-founded recommendations about simple ways to make us all safer.” – Ken Pease, Visiting Professor of Crime Science, UCL, UK

This book is a globally-significant milestone in the discipline which deftly synthesises this complex field for researchers and advanced practitioners alike; presents, and substantially adds to, over a decade of the author’s own top-quality applied empirical research on crime, crime prevention practice and policy that impacts on the daily life of all of us; and provides a launch platform for further studies that is simultaneously sturdy and stimulating.” – Paul Ekblom, Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, UK

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